Author - Molly Knight-Forde

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Music as Presence by Molly Knight Forde
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Molly Knight Forde Music- Listen
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The Fourth Way, Philosophy of Gurdjieff
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The Gurdjieff Movements

Music as Presence by Molly Knight Forde

Guest Post written by Concert Pianist Molly Knight Forde

I use playing the piano as one of my daily meditation practices because it requires total presence of body, feelings and mind. When everything is lined up, playing the piano becomes a profound event where deeper emotion moves me and I am part of something greater than myself.

The execution of the notes can take months to bring up to tempo and perfect. I must zero in on 4 or 5 difficult measures of music that don’t seem to be working at speed and analyse what the physical problem may be. This professional level of playing requires the utmost efficiency of movement and tremendous relaxation. Too much tension will affect the sound, the flow and the tempo.

I must have a zen like presence to deeply notice the physical status of my body right down to the tips of my fingers and how they make contact with the keys. Playing the piano requires this kind of physical focus.

If I can be present with each movement while engaging a listening feedback loop, I have a seemingly perfect system, but listening after the fact is too late.

I need to be so present that my creative force goes ahead of my fingers and tells them exactly how I want to produce a sound to create any effect. My refined technique becomes the perfect vehicle for spontaneity and direct expression from the heart.

I can only do this if I am in the present moment. Read More

Molly Knight Forde Music- Listen

Listen to concert pianist Molly Knight Ford play music by Debussy and Couperin. 

The Fourth Way, Philosophy of Gurdjieff

Guest Post by Molly Knight Forde

mr g diagramMany profound and life changing moments of my life have occurred at meditation retreats centered around The Fourth Way. These methods spun out of the idea that we can work “in the world” as opposed to retreating from the world.

It is called the Fourth Way because it is not just the way of the Fakir, transformation through the body, nor the Monk who uses prayer and contemplation of the Heart, nor the Yogi who practices the Stilling of the Mind.

The Fourth Way combines all three methods through various means to be done in everyday life.

“It has no specific forms or institutions and comes and goes controlled by some particular laws of its own.” G. I. Gurdjieff

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The Gurdjieff Movements

Guest Post by Molly Knight Forde

imageThe first time I was exposed to The Gurdjieff Movements I was transported to another time and place, perhaps even another dimension. The combination of gestures and music created a sense of deep reverence in me for all things spiritual.  I could hardly believe something so profound existed and that I was part of a lineage just by being in the room.  I could feel the transmission of something rather inexplicable.

The irony of this is that my first exposure was not as a participant in the class but as the pianist. I had an infant on my back, was new in town and had been hired by a friend to play for the class.  I did not know what I was in for and my friend was unaware that I had been an avid participant in a Zen Dojo, meditating daily for 9 years.

The second irony is that I had been living in Paris where Gurdjieff had lived for many years, choreographed some of his best movements, and where many “Work” groups had formed. Read More

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