Archive - April 2014

1
Heart Stories: Interview with Rose Taylor Goldfield, Part 3
2
You’re Invited! Be Our Guest
3
Reality and “Naturalness” in Training the Wisdom Body with Rose Taylor-Goldfield, Part 2
4
“Training the Wisdom Body,” Meditative Movement with Rose Taylor Goldfield
5
Practice Tibetan Yoga Exercise: Mind-Body Reboot, Rose Taylor Goldfield
6
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Heart Stories: Interview with Rose Taylor Goldfield, Part 3

This interview with Rose Taylor Goldfield is the last of a 3 part series.

(I interviewed Rose in her home, looking out a large window at the San Francisco cityscape on a sunny early-Springtime day. We talked about her Buddhist background, her teachers, this special type of Tibetan Buddhist exercise, the ideas grounding it and the “Wisdom Sun” community she co-directs with her husband Ari….)

Training the Wisdom Body Cover--originalThe first interview focused on the body. We shined light on Meditative Movement as taught by Rose Taylor-Goldfield in her brilliant book “Training the Wisdom Body: Buddhist Yogic Exercise.” (That’s Rose above in the cover photo. ) We looked at the practical side of the exercises and with the last 3 questions, got to know Rose a little better as a person.

In Part 2, we tapped into the energy in Buddhist Yoga as practiced by Rose. The meditative experience of the physical practices and the theory behind the “how to” instruction. What feelings and realities do we uncover while practicing the forms and how do we join with them authentically and in the moment?

In Part 3, below we enjoy the heart of practice as Rose tells us stories from her life, work and study with her teacher Khenpo Rinpoche and her husband Ari Goldfield.

 

The Interview, Part 3:

TINA: You say in the book that you were with your mother at the time you met your “Heart Teacher” as well as your “Heart Companion”….Can you tell us more about this?

ROSE: Yes. My mother is also a Buddhist practitioner and people ask me, “Who was Buddhist first, your mom or you?” She started meditating and studying Buddhism before I was born. We’ve been to many Buddhist programs and retreats together over the years and once we even lived in a tent together for 3 months on retreat in the Rocky Mountains.

In 2002, I was studying at Naropa University in Colorado and during the summer break I went to stay at my mother’s in Cornwall, England. The Shambhala center in London was hosting Khenpo Tsultrim Gyamtso Rinpoche and I was asked to be “head of the household,” to help host him.

I asked my mother, “Why don’t you come, too?” So, we both went and helped host Khenpo Rinpoche and Ari Goldfield (his translator and secretary who traveled everywhere with him) in this big beautiful house with a garden in London. It turned out to be a very special weekend for both of us. She’s my mother but also my spiritual friend and we’ve shared a lot together in the Buddhadharma. We’ve experienced a lot of depth and profundity in our relationship.

TINA: That’s so lovely. And, so then you met your “Heart Companion,” your husband Ari…… Read More

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Reality and “Naturalness” in Training the Wisdom Body with Rose Taylor-Goldfield, Part 2

This interview with Rose Taylor Goldfield is the second of a 3 part series on “Training the Wisdom Body”.

(I interviewed Rose in her home, looking out a large window at the San Francisco cityscape on a sunny early-Springtime day. We talked about her Buddhist background, her teachers, this special type of Tibetan Buddhist exercise, the ideas grounding it and the “Wisdom Sun” community she co-directs with her husband Ari….)

Training the Wisdom Body Cover--originalThe first interview shined light on Meditative Movement as taught by Rose Taylor-Goldfield in her brilliant book “Training the Wisdom Body: Buddhist Yogic Exercise.” (That’s Rose above in the cover photo. ) We looked at the practical side of the exercises and with the last 3 questions, got to know Rose a little better as a person.

In Part 2 below, we sink into the meaning behind the physical practices and the theory behind the “how to” instruction. The feelings and realities we uncover while practicing the forms and what it means to join with them authentically and in the moment.

 

The Interview, Part 2:

Tina: I want to try to avoid getting too academic here, because what we’re about to discuss really is the beauty of the practice…the meditative life that keeps the movement from being just empty form. So here goes….Can you help us laypeople out with understanding the link between “Buddhism” and “Yoga” in language and history?

Picture-120Rose: In Tibetan, the word for Buddhist is nangpa sangjehpa. Nangpa means “insider” in the sense of one who turns inward to examine her own mind as a practice. You can see how the term Buddhist from this definition could be applied to many things. In this context, “yoga” isn’t referring to a separate tradition. It’s actually a translation of the Tibetan word naljor, which is used to translate the Sanskrit word yoga. It means to “join with reality,” seeing what’s actually there, being in accord with reality instead of covering it over with our own ideas and beliefs.

Read More

“Training the Wisdom Body,” Meditative Movement with Rose Taylor Goldfield

Training the Wisdom Body Cover--original

This interview is the first of a 3 part series.

This first part shines light on Meditative Movement as taught by Rose Taylor-Goldfield in her brilliant book Training the Wisdom Body: Buddhist Yogic Exercise. That’s Rose above in the cover photo. The “Dancing Warrior” stance she’s demonstrating is explored in greater detail below.

This book will help enlighten even the earliest explorations of physical yoga and meditation. It’s also great for teachers, or anyone who takes on the challenge of talking about the practical and psychological as one. The integration of breath, movement and mind is so natural and clear in Rose’s explanation.

I interviewed Rose in her home, looking out upon the San Francisco cityscape on a sunny early-Springtime day. We talked about her Buddhist background, her teachers, this special type of Tibetan Buddhist exercise, the ideas grounding it and the Wisdom Sun community she co-directs with her husband Ari.

Read More

Practice Tibetan Yoga Exercise: Mind-Body Reboot, Rose Taylor Goldfield

Shake tension out of your body and refresh your mind with Rose in this Tibetan Yoga Exercise known as the Mind-Body Reboot.

Untitled

This practice is based upon the  form of Tibetan Yoga Exercise known as Lu Jong. In this exercise, we rotate around the 4 energy centers of the body: the origin point (below the navel), the heart, throat and crown centers of the body. By rotating, we loosen physical and emotional energy in the body. Then we shake it out to release excess tension. This allows us to feel more alert but also more relaxed.

More about Rose and Tibetan Meditative Movement: See Interview with Rose, Part 1.

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